Golf Lessons: Total Driving Washington DC

Long hitters transfer energy from their body to the clubhead in the proper sequence of actions. Short hitters move all the same body parts, but in the wrong order. How can you hit it far and straight? Read on.

University of Maryland Junior Golf Camp
(301) 403-4181
University of Maryland Golf Course
College Park, MD
 
4 Star Summer Camps at the University of Virginia
(800) 334-7827
PO Box 3387
Falls Church, VA
 
Turfgrass Trends
1775 T Street NW
Washington, DC
 
East Potomac Public Golf Course -White
202/554-7660
970 Ohio Dr Sw
Washington , DC
Type
Public
# of Holes
9

Data Provided by:
East Potomac Golf Course
(202) 554-7660
972 Ohio Dr SW
Washington, DC
 
University of Maryland Junior Golf Camp
(301) 403-4181
University of Maryland Golf Course
College Park, MD
 
4 Star Summer Camps at the University of Virginia
(800) 334-7827
PO Box 3387
Falls Church, VA
 
Langston Golf Course & Driving Range
202/397-8638
2600 Benning Rd Ne
Washington , DC
Type
Public
# of Holes
18

Data Provided by:
Ft. Mcnair Golf Course
202/685-3138
262 3rd Ave Sw Sports Center
Fort Mcnair , DC
Type
Military
# of Holes
9

Data Provided by:
Langston Course & D.R.
(202) 397-8638
2600 Benning Rd NE
Washington, DC
 
Data Provided by:

Stripe It!

Stripe It!

Who says you can’t hit it far and straight?

On the PGA Tour, they call it “Total Driving.” That’s the stat that ranks players according to how far and straight they drive the ball. Currently, Bo Van Pelt is the Tour’s best all-around driver, but there are a number of top-ranked players on his heels, including Zach Johnson, K.J. Choi and this year’s Northern Trust Champ, Steve Stricker (see the sidebar at the end of this story for more on Stricker’s excellent driving). Each man loves to hit his second shot with a short club from the short grass. Then again, who doesn’t?

In this article, I’m passing on my 10 favorite distance and accuracy tips. Some are old stand-bys, others are ones never before published in Golf Tips, but each one is easy to do and yields immediate results. Practice them and I guarantee you’ll hit the ball the farthest and straightest ever.

Swing In Sequence
Long hitters transfer energy from their body to the clubhead in the proper sequence of actions. Short hitters move all the same body parts, but in the wrong order.

Good downswings unwind from the ground up, through your body: hips, shoulders, arms, hands and then finally the clubhead. Ben Hogan referred to this sequence as a chain reaction that multiplies your clubhead speed so it’s moving the fastest at the last possible moment.

Notice here how my hips already are starting to unwind, my shoulders still are turned back, and the clubhead remains where it was at the “top” of my swing. I’ve just started to unwind, but you can see that what I’m doing is athletic and utilizing all my power.

Zachary Allen’s Stats
Driver: 9° Cleveland Launcher DST
Shaft: Mitsubishi Rayon Diamana (stiff flex)
Clubhead Speed: 107 mph
Average Driving Distance: 289 yards
Golf Ball: Srixon Z-Star

Find Your Grip…Halfway Back
To drive it as far as possible, it’s vital to create and maintain lag in your downswing. Great drivers, from Ben Hogan to Sergio Garcia, have done this remarkably well. Still, most golfers don’t realize that to have a lot of lag, you first have to have the proper grip—one that’s in your fingers, not in your palms.

To find the proper grip, hold the club in your right hand and take it halfway back. Now, place your left hand on it, holding the club in your fingers, with a slight bend in your left wrist. This helps you feel the right amount of lag and leverage. Now you’re ready to release it into the back of the ball.
Now, just return the club to address with your hands on it the right way and start hitting shots.

Click here to read the rest of this article from Golf Tips Magazine

Total Driving

Total Driving

Sean O'Hair's coach helps you hit it long (and down the middle) every time


2 Manage Your Drive
While it’s tempting to “grip it and rip it,” it’s more realistic to think of your drives the same way tennis players think of their second serves—with the emphasis on placement. Tiger and Phil might miss nearly half their fairways, but they have the strength and skill to get out of the rough and put enough spin on the ball to stop it on the green. I suggest playing to your strengths. In the photo, I’m teeing it up on the right side of the teebox because the hole is a dogleg right. That gives me a great angle if my natural shot shape is left to right, which is the case for most amateurs. The key point is, whether you play a draw or a fade, it’s important to play to your strengths off the tee and not attempt shots that are beyond you. Trust me, you’ll save strokes if you play it smart.

Play to your strengths! Although most amateurs slice the ball, I rarely see them actually play for one. If your ballflight normally curves from left to right, consider teeing it up on the right side of the teebox. That way, you can aim to the left and let the ball find the fairway.

Yes!
My lead hand is square to the target line. You can clearly see the label on my glove.

No!
My hand (and, hence, clubface) is pointing to the right of the target line. Look out slice!

No!
Fore left! My glove’s logo is facing way left, and that’s where the ball will go.



3 Control Your Clubface
Hey, what happened to my golf club? Well, I don’t need one to demonstrate how your glove hand mirrors your clubface position during the golf swing. At impact, if the back of your glove hand faces to the right of your target line (see the center photo above), your club hasn’t released yet, so the clubface remains open (causing a slice). On the other hand, if the back of your hand points left of your target line (above, right), you released the club too soon and closed the clubface, producing a hook. To find the proper impact position, check out the top, left photo. The back of my left hand is perpendicular to my target line, pointing right down the heart of the fairway (note how you can clearly see my glove’s label). When this happens, I guarantee the clubface will be square, your shot will be straight, and you’ll hit the fairway every time. See? No club needed.

Click here to read the rest of this article from Golf Tips Magazine