Golf Lessons: Swing Finish Washington DC

Basically, there are only two positions in the golf swing: the address and the finish. Everything else is a motion and, as such, difficult to analyze. But the finish is static and allows for serious self-analysis. If you know what to look for, then how you end your swing can give you some good ideas of what’s going on in your motion.

University of Maryland Junior Golf Camp
(301) 403-4181
University of Maryland Golf Course
College Park, MD
 
4 Star Summer Camps at the University of Virginia
(800) 334-7827
PO Box 3387
Falls Church, VA
 
Turfgrass Trends
1775 T Street NW
Washington, DC
 
East Potomac Golf Course
(202) 554-7660
972 Ohio Dr SW
Washington, DC
 
East Potomac Public Golf Course -Red
202/554-7660
970 Ohio Dr Sw
Washington , DC
Type
Public
# of Holes
9

Data Provided by:
University of Maryland Junior Golf Camp
(301) 403-4181
University of Maryland Golf Course
College Park, MD
 
4 Star Summer Camps at the University of Virginia
(800) 334-7827
PO Box 3387
Falls Church, VA
 
East Potomac Public Golf Course -Blue
202/554-7660
970 Ohio Dr Sw
Washington , DC
Type
Public
# of Holes
18

Data Provided by:
Langston Golf Course & Driving Range
202/397-8638
2600 Benning Rd Ne
Washington , DC
Type
Public
# of Holes
18

Data Provided by:
East Potomac Public Golf Course -White
202/554-7660
970 Ohio Dr Sw
Washington , DC
Type
Public
# of Holes
9

Data Provided by:
Data Provided by:

Fade and Draw Finishes

Finishing School 5/12/08

The Fade Finish
The body is in a unique position during the fade finish. The right shoulder is much lower than in the draw finish and hasn’t traveled around toward the target. The left elbow is higher than the clubhead, and the torso remains very tilted to the right. This finish encourages the club to swing more to the left after impact, restricting the full release of the club.

To produce a predictable, left-to-right ballflight, the club must move to the left immediately after impact.

The Draw Finish
When you’re after a subtle right-to-left ballflight and want to swing more naturally, focusing on your finish can be a great trick. The draw finish should have the right shoulder higher and more around toward the target with very little bend remaining in the torso. Focusing solely on the finish should allow you to produce a subtle draw with ease.

The finish for a right-to-left shot (draw) should feature the club coming up through the left shoulder.

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Finishing School

Finishing School

Look at the end of your swing to find and fix hidden flaws


Finishing SchoolHigh Finish
Basically, there are only two positions in the golf swing: the address and the finish. Everything else is a motion and, as such, difficult to analyze. But the finish is static and allows for serious self-analysis. If you know what to look for, then how you end your swing can give you some good ideas of what’s going on in your motion.

Let’s begin with two common finish positions: the high and the low finish. The high finish (see Chris DiMarco for an example) is characterized by high hands and a bit of a flying left elbow (for righties). Typically, the high finish is associated with pushes, push hooks and push fades, as well as thin shots and shots struck toward the heel. While finishing high isn’t necessarily a bad thing, the type of motion needed to create it can cause problems. High finishers tend to swing on a very inside-out path through impact, with the club traveling to the right of the target. Yes, inside out is the preferred path, but when taken to the extreme as evidenced by a high finish, control is minimized.

Why So High?
Developing an overly inside-out swing path is a fairly common mistake, particularly for better players. Accomplished players and other top-level golfers almost never move the club more than a degree or two inside to out, however. The key is to be fairly subtle with this move, not to grossly overdo it. When the inside-out move becomes severe, the most common shot error is a push. When the club comes too far from the inside with a closed clubface, the ball will hook, often badly. In addition, swinging the club too far from in to out will deliver the club below the swing plane, which often prevents the club from striking the ball on the desired, slightly descending path. Shots hit from this position don’t get compressed and often are thinned.

Low Finish
In contrast to the high finish, the low finish results from an overly outside-to-in swing path. Players who develop this swing path typically come over the top of the plane, causing the clubhead to cut across the ball through the impact zone. Divots resulting from this type of swing will run diagonal across the target line and will tend to be fairly deep. An overly outside-to-in swing path often is caused by a downswing motion that’s initiated by the arms instead of the body. When the arms outrace the body through the hitting zone instead of being dragged through, the club comes over the top of the plane and Lunge Finishgenerally comes into the hitting zone on a steep angle. Shots created by this type of move are pull slices (when the face is open through impact), pull hooks (when the face is closed through impact) and shots struck on the toe.
     
Why So Low?
Since the club is moving steeply and across the ball, none of these shots are typically well struck, and certainly don’t often fly at the intended...

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Focus on the Finish

Focus On The Finish

Focus On The Finish Many amateurs are so consumed with anxiety about the incremental parts of the golf swing (grip, alignment, posture, setup, etc.) that they lose sight of the overall objective, which is to strike the ball squarely and forcefully. Let me suggest a method to alleviate this anxiety: Focus on the finish.

If you take the time to study, analyze and critique your finish position, you’ll develop an idea of where your swing needs to go—not to mention increase the likelihood of actually making it happen.

Here’s a drill that ingrains the feeling of a good finish position. Start with the club at address and swing it forward to the finish. Hold that pose for several seconds and then repeat the address-to-finish move. Let your natural tempo dictate how slowly or quickly you swing the club. As you pose, check that the finish elements at right are in place.

A golf swing without a finish position in mind is like a car trip without a destination. You’ll wind up going around in circles.

Some of the benchmarks of the proper finish are:
• Being in good balance
• Weight forward on your left side
• Knees touching
• Belt buckle facing the target
• Club to the left of the left shoulder
• Right arm extended and right wrist flat

Art Sellinger is a two-time National Long Drive champion and creator of the popular “Power Guarantee” training program, available at www.artoflongdriving.com .

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