Golf Lessons: Stroke Washington DC

Golfers use two kinds of putting strokes: a square- to-square stroke that swings (and stays) square to the target line and an arcing stroke that travels inside the target line on the backstroke and follow through. If you need some help improving your stroke you'll find tips and information on how to do that right here.

University of Maryland Junior Golf Camp
(301) 403-4181
University of Maryland Golf Course
College Park, MD
 
4 Star Summer Camps at the University of Virginia
(800) 334-7827
PO Box 3387
Falls Church, VA
 
Turfgrass Trends
1775 T Street NW
Washington, DC
 
East Potomac Golf Course
(202) 554-7660
972 Ohio Dr SW
Washington, DC
 
East Potomac Public Golf Course -Red
202/554-7660
970 Ohio Dr Sw
Washington , DC
Type
Public
# of Holes
9

Data Provided by:
University of Maryland Junior Golf Camp
(301) 403-4181
University of Maryland Golf Course
College Park, MD
 
4 Star Summer Camps at the University of Virginia
(800) 334-7827
PO Box 3387
Falls Church, VA
 
East Potomac Public Golf Course -Blue
202/554-7660
970 Ohio Dr Sw
Washington , DC
Type
Public
# of Holes
18

Data Provided by:
Landscape Architecture Magazine 
(202) 686-2752
4401 Connecticut Avenue
NW Washington, DC
 
East Potomac Public Golf Course -White
202/554-7660
970 Ohio Dr Sw
Washington , DC
Type
Public
# of Holes
9

Data Provided by:
Data Provided by:

Fine-Tune Your Stroke

Fine-Tune Your Stroke

Fine Tune Your Stroke The ability to control putterhead speed translates into the ability to control the speed of the ball and, ultimately, your ability to make more than your fair share of putts. If your control has become shaky, here’s a two-part drill to help you get the ball rolling at the speed you desire.

Drop a coin on the practice green, then place a ball about 10 feet from the coin. Now, survey the terrain from the ball to the coin. Make note if it’s an uphill, downhill or level putt. You should also note the break—is it straight or a left-to-right- or a right-to-left-breaking putt? Now, from behind or next to the ball, create a dynamic, mind’s-eye picture of the speed necessary to get the ball to stop no further than one putterhead-length past the coin (about four and a half inches).

Your task is to roll three putts from the same distance and stop all three within the space of the putterhead behind the coin. You can place a coin one putterhead-length behind the first coin to help you visually judge the exact distance.

Before the first putt, adopt a plan that will ensure the accuracy of the golf ball’s roll. For example, if the putt is uphill, you may want to adjust your focal point beyond the coin to adjust for the terrain. Some of my students like to ingrain a picture of the putt’s last four feet of roll. Others simply focus on feel. Each of these methods, whether it’s spot aiming, roll visualizing or feel focusing, uses the eyes to send signals to the brain to apply the necessary energy for the putt.

Your job is to find which type of focus best allows you to control speed. Use only one ball for the drill, and if successful, retrieve the ball and putt from the same spot. Ideally, you want three straight putts to end up as desired. If not, start over and keep working to find the best way (focus) to accomplish this task.

The next step is to add a foot to the length of the first putt. After each successful attempt, add another foot.

In the same manner you work to fine-tune your wedge game and full swing, so, too, should you fine-tune your putting stroke. If time permits, perform the above drill daily, always noting your progress and frequency. Soon, you’ll find yourself draining those 15-footers.

Dr. Craig Farnsworth has worked with over 100 PGA, LPGA and Champions Tour players. He was a featured presenter at the 2000 PGA Teaching & Coaching Summit and frequently instructs on The Golf Channel. He operates the See & Score Golf School in La Quinta, Calif., and conducts clinics around the country. For more information, visit www.puttdoctor.com .

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On the Fringe

On The Fringe

How practicing on an arc can improve your stroke

on the fringeGolfers use two kinds of putting strokes: a square- to-square stroke that swings (and stays) square to the target line and an arcing stroke that travels inside the target line on the backstroke and follow through. Although both have their advantages, in this tip I’ll talk about the arcing stroke. It’s most commonly used by people who putt with a blade (as opposed to the square-to-square stroke, which is more commonly used with a mallet). If you have an arcing stroke and are struggling with your putting mid-round, take a short timeout (while your playing partners are putting) and place the toe of your putter along the collar of a circular putting green. Keeping your putter toe on the collar, make a smooth, rhythmic motion so the toe slightly opens and closes to the arc of the green. Once you try this with a ball, you’ll get your stroke back on track and your putts will roll true and hug the turf right into the cup.

Jeff Ritter, PGA, is Director of Instruction at the ASU Karsten Golf Academy in Tempe, Ariz., and the author of Golf by Design.

If you putt with an arc stroke and are struggling with it mid-round, take a minute and head over to the fringe to get it back on track.

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Putt in Rhythm

Putt In Rhythm

Putt In Rhythm A square putterface and a straight-back, straight-through path are crucial fundamentals for a solid stroke. These two elements control direction, which is undeniably one of the two most important aspects of good putting. However, perhaps the most important fundamental, rhythm, is often overlooked. Rhythm establishes the steadiness of the putting stroke and is the main factor in controlling distance and speed. Rhythm is the heartbeat of a good stroke, and is at least as important, if not more so, than any other aspect of successful putting.

Regardless of whether your tempo is fast or slow, the clubhead should move at a constant pace going back and coming forward. If your putting stroke accelerates too quickly or decelerates abruptly at impact, it’s extremely difficult to control the distance of the putt. A stroke made in this manner is easy to identify because the backstroke and followthrough are different in speed and length. The sure sign of a stroke with good rhythm is one where the backstroke and followthrough move at the same speed and are of equal lengths.

A stroke with good rhythm is often described as a “pendulum” stroke. However, this term implies that the putter swings itself from a fixed point. Instead, it would be more appropriate to think of the stroke as being powered by the arms and shoulders while the putter is kept from swinging on its own. When the arms and shoulders control the putter, good rhythm is much easier to achieve because there’s no independent motion of the putterhead. Focusing on moving the arms and shoulders (while controlling the putter) at the same speed and the same distance back and through will ensure solid contact and consistent control over the distance of your putts.

PGA teaching professional Brady Riggs instructs at Woodley Lakes GC in Van Nuys, Calif. For more information on Riggs and his instruction programs, visit www.bradyriggs.com .

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