Golf Lessons: Squaring the Clubface Washington DC

There’s only one thing that can cause a slice, and that’s a clubface that’s either open (or opening) at the point of contact. That being said, here are three tips to help you square up the clubface and rid your game of that slice forever!

University of Maryland Junior Golf Camp
(301) 403-4181
University of Maryland Golf Course
College Park, MD
 
4 Star Summer Camps at the University of Virginia
(800) 334-7827
PO Box 3387
Falls Church, VA
 
Turfgrass Trends
1775 T Street NW
Washington, DC
 
Ft. Mcnair Golf Course
202/685-3138
262 3rd Ave Sw Sports Center
Fort Mcnair , DC
Type
Military
# of Holes
9

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Landscape Architecture Magazine 
(202) 686-2752
4401 Connecticut Avenue
NW Washington, DC
 
University of Maryland Junior Golf Camp
(301) 403-4181
University of Maryland Golf Course
College Park, MD
 
4 Star Summer Camps at the University of Virginia
(800) 334-7827
PO Box 3387
Falls Church, VA
 
Langston Course & D.R.
(202) 397-8638
2600 Benning Rd NE
Washington, DC
 
East Potomac Public Golf Course -Blue
202/554-7660
970 Ohio Dr Sw
Washington , DC
Type
Public
# of Holes
18

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East Potomac Public Golf Course -White
202/554-7660
970 Ohio Dr Sw
Washington , DC
Type
Public
# of Holes
9

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No Spin Zone

No Spin Zone

Square The Clubface And Hit It Straight!
As most of us know, the slice is probably the most common fault in all of golf, particularly for the recreational player. Though that fact isn’t particularly surprising, what is surprising is how long people are willing to struggle before seeking a legitimate method of eradicating the slice from their game. One of the typical methods players pursue in hopes of straightening their slice is trying to develop more of an inside-out swing path, which isn’t necessarily a bad thing. However, though an outside-in swing path definitely promotes the production of left-to-right spin (slice spin), the ultimate cause of slicing is an open clubface at impact. Learn to get the clubface square through the hitting zone, and that left-to-right spin—and those banana balls—will quickly disappear.

The basic fact that all slicers have to accept is that, though other factors contribute to poor golf shots, more than 70-percent of shot shape is due to clubface angle and nothing else. Controlling the clubface is the secret to both solid contact and accuracy, and is the one thing you must focus on if you hope to improve. To help accomplish this task (which isn’t as daunting as you might think), I’ve come up with three simple clubface keys that just about any golfer can learn. Work on these keys, and I guarantee your slices will become significantly less severe, and maybe straighten out completely.

 

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Three Slice Fixes

Three Slice FIxes

Three Slice FixesThere’s only one thing that can cause a slice, and that’s a clubface that’s either open (or opening) at the point of contact. That being said, here are three tips to help you square up the clubface and rid your game of that slice forever!

Get A Stronger Grip. The clubface tends to return to the ball “open” when the hands are placed on the club in a weak position—that is, turned too far to the left. A correct grip has the hands rotated more to the right. To strengthen your grip, rotate your left hand so that your thumb is positioned to the right of center (two to three knuckles should be visible). The right hand also should be rotated to the right, matching the angle of the left hand. To experiment, turn your hands to the right until the ball begins to hook, then back off a little for optimal positioning.

Ease Up! Excessive pressure in your hands and arms inhibits the natural rotation of the clubface through the hitting area. Soften the pressure in your hands, wrists, arms and shoulders to encourage a more natural, effortless face rotation. If you imagined a scale running from zero to 10, where 10 was the tightest you could possibly squeeze the club and zero was the club slipping out of your hands, then the ideal pressure for most shots would be a 3.

Flatten Your Plane. Most slicers approach the ball on too vertical a plane, another error that facilitates an open clubface at the point of contact. A flatter swing shape will promote a natural squaring of the clubface and create the preferred right-to-left ballflight. To sense the feeling of swinging on a flatter plane, make some practice swings with the clubhead moving back and through at knee-high level. Swinging the club in this elevated position will help you feel the more rounded swing shape needed to allow the toe of your clubhead to rotate past the heel. After a few of these “baseball” swings, try one off the ground with the same feel. Your ensuing ballflight should be much straighter and, perhaps, curve slightly to the left.

PGA professional Jeff Ritter is the Director of Instruction at the ASU Karsten Golf Academy in Tempe, Ariz.

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