Golf Lessons: Speed Beatrice NE

Often, golfers will try to increase their swing speed by overpowering the downswing with their arms and shoulders, regrettably resulting in the dreaded over-the-top move and slice-induced blow to the ball. Real power comes from delivering the club on the correct angle.

Beatrice Country Club
402/223-2710
13th & Oak St
Beatrice , NE
Type
Private
# of Holes
18
Course Architect
Tom Bendelow

Data Provided by:
Carol N-tzschke-Henrich
(402) 444-4656
Johnny Goodman Golf Course
Omaha, NE
Started Teaching
1985
Gender
Female
Professional Affiliation
PGA
Price Information
Junior Rate: $25.00
Playing Rate: $50.00

Tim Nelson
(402) 592-7788
Eagle Hills Golf Course
Papillion, NE
Started Teaching
1967
Gender
Male
Professional Affiliation
PGA
Price Information
Hourly Rate: $45.00
Junior Rate: $25.00
Video Rate: $45.00
Playing Rate: $60.00

Patrick Kilbride
(402) 333-0500
Shadow Ridge Country Club
Omaha, NE
Started Teaching
1992
Gender
Male
Professional Affiliation
PGA
Price Information
Hourly Rate: $70.00
Junior Rate: $20.00
Clinic Rate: $250.00
Video Rate: $70.00
Playing Rate: $130.00

Lou Ann Herstead
(800) 858-9633
Craft Zavichas Golf School
Scottsbluff, NE
Started Teaching
1985
Gender
Female
Professional Affiliation
PGA / LPGA

Hidden Acres Golf Course
402/228-2146
Route 2
Beatrice , NE
Type
Semi-Private
# of Holes
18
Course Architect
Marty Johnson

Data Provided by:
Tom Erlandson
(402) 475-4653
Woodland Hills Golf Course
Eagle, NE
Started Teaching
1989
Gender
Male
Professional Affiliation
PGA
Price Information
Hourly Rate: $50.00
Junior Rate: $25.00
Clinic Rate: $75.00
Video Rate: $65.00
Playing Rate: $75.00
Accepts Lesson Gift Certificates

Glen Blakeman
(402) 371-5108
John Jacobs Golf Schools
Norfolk, NE
Gender
Male
Professional Affiliation
PGA

Mike Higgins
(402) 660-0274
The Champions Club
Omaha, NE
Started Teaching
1987
Gender
Male
Professional Affiliation
PGA
Price Information
Hourly Rate: $60.00
Junior Rate: $30.00
Video Rate: $75.00
Playing Rate: $100.00

James Sieckmann
(402) 333-1100
Shadow Ridge Golf Academy
Omaha, NE
Started Teaching
1990
Gender
Male
Professional Affiliation
PGA
Price Information
Hourly Rate: $90.00
Clinic Rate: $300.00
Video Rate: $90.00
Playing Rate: $150.00

Data Provided by:

Speed Plane

Speed Plane

Speed PlaneOne of the main reasons why recreational golfers can’t generate the power they’d like to is that they never fully get the club in their hands on-plane, especially the longer irons and, to an even greater extent, the driver. What recreational golfers need to understand is that the plane on which the club should travel changes from club to club—it’s a path dictated by the lie angle of the iron or wood you wish to swing. As the lie angle decreases from the short irons to the driver, the desired swing plane becomes flatter.

I see many beginning golfers and those who struggle with a lack of power and a chronic slice swing their woods on a plane more fitting for a high-lofted iron. That is, they swing the club on too steep a plane. When you swing above the appropriate plane, you rob your motion of width, and creating as wide an arc as possible is the key to generating extra speed with your longer clubs. In addition, if you’re too steep going back, you’ll likely be too steep coming down—fore right!

To get a better sense of the difference between driver and wedge planes, try this drill. Hold your driver with your right hand and any wedge with your left. Notice how much flatter your driver shaft lies than that of your wedge. Now, imagine a plane of glass resting on both shafts—this describes the path on which you should take back either club. Go ahead and make a mock backswing with both clubs. If you’ve kept the clubs on their respective planes, you’ll have moved your left arm above your right.

If you can move your driver on the right plane, and give your swing extra width, you’ll be set to swing with more speed and hit with greater power.

French PGA Teaching professional Frédéric Anger instructs at Saint Donant GC in Grasse, France.

Click here to read the rest of this article from Golf Tips Magazine

Speed Through

Speed Through

Speed Through Many amateur golfers sacrifice power and distance because they become infatuated with swinging at the ball—not through it. They’re so intently focused on making solid contact that they become fixated with the point of impact.

Watch closely the next time you visit a driving range and you’ll see what I mean. The majority of amateurs lose speed at the bottom of the swing because they regard contact with the ball as an end to itself. They resort to making what I call a “false finish”—after losing the momentum of their swing at impact, they try to play “catch up” with body rotation and by having their knees touch.

Impact is an intermediate step to a golf swing; the completion point of the swing is a balanced followthrough with the body rotated toward the target. Anyone serious about trying to increase distance must train himself or herself to swing through the ball, not at it. As the popular saying goes, “Let the ball get in the way.”

That’s more than a golf adage, though. It’s sound advice. A solid swing should be one continuous motion, with the speed created on the backswing and enhanced by centrifugal force on the downswing finally reaching its peak immediately after impact, not at or before.

An important concept to understand when talking about increasing the speed of your swing is that distance is affected by an efficient transfer of energy, not solely from the creation of energy itself. This transfer of energy is similar to the motion of a whip. As you start the whip in motion, energy is created. This energy moves out from the handle (from which it was formed) out toward the tip, which soon moves much faster than did the handle when you started the whip in motion. The transfer of energy is so efficient and powerful that ultimately the tip breaks the sound barrier (which produces the “crack.”) The same thing happens in a fundamentally sound golf swing. Your hips begin the downswing and transfer energy to the shoulders, then to the hands and ultimately to the clubhead.

It makes sense, then, that the hips, shoulders, hands and clubhead reach their respective top speeds at different points in the downswing. Computer studies have proven that hip speed peaks out at about halfway through the downswing. Shoulder spin rate peaks out just as the clubhead reaches the impact zone. The hands achieve their maximum speed just prior to contact and the clubhead shortly thereafter. In other words, keep accelerating as the ball rockets off the clubface.

Senior Instruction Editor and two-time National Long Drive champion Art Sellinger is a member of the Pinnacle Distance Team. Art’s Power Guarantee training system are available by calling (817) 329-8262 or visiting www.artoflongdriving.com .

Click here to read the rest of this article from Golf Tips Magazine

Three Needs for Speed

Three Needs For Speed

Three Needs For SpeedLike a high-performance engine that stalls when it leaks oil, water or fuel, a golf swing comes to an idling stop when the potential energy created in the backswing is emptied well before impact. Here are three tips to help keep power from leaking out of your game and also add horsepower to your motion.

Make A “Differential” Impact
When you watch long-hitting players on the PGA Tour, pay attention to the relationship of their hips and shoulders at impact. The secret formula here is what I like to call 30/5. At impact, the hips should be open about 30 degrees, and the shoulders open somewhere between zero and five degrees. Practice a few golf swings with a mirror and hold your impact position. If your hips are square and shoulders are open, keep making practice swings until you get a feel for the 30/5 ratio.

Find Your Slot
Often, golfers will try to increase their swing speed by overpowering the downswing with their arms and shoulders, regrettably resulting in the dreaded over-the-top move and slice-induced blow to the ball. Real power comes from delivering the club on the correct angle. Midway through the downswing, the clubshaft should bisect the right forearm (left for left-handers). Make a practice swing with a mirror to your right and, at 3⁄4 of the way down, stop and verify that the clubhead passes over your right elbow in the mirror. Perform this drill in slow motion first until you get a feel for correctly “slotting” the club. Once you do, you can kiss the over-the-top, smothered shot goodbye.

Release And Rotate
A proper release through impact guarantees the maximum release of energy into the ball. A fundamentally solid release features extended arms following contact, with the right forearm positioned above the left forearm. In addition, the forearms should be touching. To make sure you’re fully extended through impact, place a sweatband, watch or towel (attached with a rubber band) on your left forearm. Following impact, you should feel your right forearm touch the worn item. Practice this move until you no longer need a reminder and you’ll soon find yourself a few extra yards down the fairway.

PGA teaching professional Dan Campbell is the director of instruction at Whisper Rock Golf Club in Scottsdale, Ariz.

Click here to read the rest of this article from Golf Tips Magazine