Golf Lessons: Power Driving Washington DC

Your weight should shift left with your lower body onto your left heel while your head maintains its position. This is vital to achieving the power you’re looking for. Read more about golf.

University of Maryland Junior Golf Camp
(301) 403-4181
University of Maryland Golf Course
College Park, MD
 
4 Star Summer Camps at the University of Virginia
(800) 334-7827
PO Box 3387
Falls Church, VA
 
Turfgrass Trends
1775 T Street NW
Washington, DC
 
Langston Course & D.R.
(202) 397-8638
2600 Benning Rd NE
Washington, DC
 
East Potomac Public Golf Course -White
202/554-7660
970 Ohio Dr Sw
Washington , DC
Type
Public
# of Holes
9

Data Provided by:
University of Maryland Junior Golf Camp
(301) 403-4181
University of Maryland Golf Course
College Park, MD
 
4 Star Summer Camps at the University of Virginia
(800) 334-7827
PO Box 3387
Falls Church, VA
 
East Potomac Public Golf Course -Blue
202/554-7660
970 Ohio Dr Sw
Washington , DC
Type
Public
# of Holes
18

Data Provided by:
Langston Golf Course & Driving Range
202/397-8638
2600 Benning Rd Ne
Washington , DC
Type
Public
# of Holes
18

Data Provided by:
Landscape Architecture Magazine 
(202) 686-2752
4401 Connecticut Avenue
NW Washington, DC
 
Data Provided by:

Formulas For Power

Formulas For Power

Maximize your distance by learning the methods of some of the Tour?s longest hitters

CHIII "How do those guys hit it so far?” has got to be the most common question asked by recreational golfers in regard to the pros. Strength training, stretching, finely tuned equipment and lots of practice are certainly part of the reason, not to mention outrageous amounts of talent. But while it’s relatively easy to understand why tall, strongly built guys like Tiger Woods, Ernie Els and Vijay Singh can crush their tee shots, it’s not clear to most golf fans why a lot of the average-sized guys on Tour can do it, too.

The fact is that creating powerful golf shots is more a question of speed and leverage than size. Obviously, a taller player with longer arms is going to be able to create a larger swing arc and more potential power. But the key is that it’s only “potential power” until that player learns how to unlock it. And this fact holds true for a golfer of any size. If you want to hit the ball as far as you can, you need to have a swing that can translate your potential power into yards.

How It's Done
The golfers in this story were chosen specifically for their respective abilities to produce a lot of speed and power through the use of efficient mechanics. The drills contained in the following pages are designed to help ingrain the same.

C/AL = P + Tq
chest and left arm connection = power and torque
Charles Howell III

The Connection
The connection Charles Howell III maintains between his upper left arm and chest is the hallmark of an explosive, yet synchronized swing that’s powered by the body, not the arms and hands. At no time in the swing is this more apparent than just after impact when the body’s pivot is still moving the club into the finish. This connection ensures the arms will stay close to the body where more leverage can be utilized with less opportunity for the club to move off the proper swing path.

Left Arm Connect Drill Great Extension
The terrific extension Howell demonstrates after impact can be very misleading. It may appear that his arms are long because they’re tight and rigid. Nothing could be further from the truth. In order for his arms to look this long, they must be extremely relaxed. The proper sequence of the downswing shoots the arms out of the shoulders, creating a whip-like effect through the impact zone.

Power Sequence
Left Hip Clear
CHIII’s right hand may seem to be rolling over the left after impact; however, this is a bit of an illusion. In fact, his body’s rotation is in time with the appearance of rotation in the hands and arms and is the real power behind the release. While there’s a minimal amount of forearm rotation through impact, Howell’s arms and hands still remain in front of his body, with the butt end of the club pointing at the navel as it was at setup. This “body release” of the club is more powerful and consistent than relying on the hands and arms.

Left Arm...

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Get Reckless

Get Reckless

Get Reckless Most power tips I share with readers of Golf Tips® have to do with the physical components of generating speed and power in the golf swing. For this issue, the power tip is a mental one.

What I refer to as “bringing your power to the tee” is more of a frame of mind than a matter of swing mechanics or technique. To hit your longest and straightest drives, you must be mentally geared up to unleash your potential power. This holds true whether you’re playing a $2 Nassau with your buddies or competing in the finals of the RE/MAX World Long Drive Championship.

You can’t go deep if you’re filled with fear or anxiety about the outcome of the shot. You can’t hold on to the club through impact, instead of releasing it down the target line. You can’t try to steer the ball, instead of allowing it to work toward the target. And you can’t come to a tight driving hole and start staring at the OB stakes on the right or the water on left, instead of narrowing your focus to an intended landing spot.

I’ve listened to experts like Jackie Burke Jr. and Jim McLean discuss the topic of being a “little reckless” with the driver, and I agree with their thoughts. Golfers can’t allow fear or anxiety to dictate a shot. Nor can they become overanalytical during the golf swing. They have to just let things happen. They have to trust themselves and then allow their athletic instincts to take over from there.

As the saying goes, let the big dog hunt; don’t try to hold him back with a leash. That often can be more of a mental challenge than a physical one.

Two-time National Long Drive champion Art Sellinger is a member of the Pinnacle Distance Team. Copies of Sellinger’s “Power Guarantee” training system are available at (817) 329-8262 or by visiting www.artoflongdriving.com .

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Power Driving

Power Driving

Hitting bigger, more powerful drives is just a few tips away.




Unhinging your wrists at this early stage of the downswing will drain all of your power.

Don’t allow your upper body to follow your weight onto your left side in the downswing.

Two common mistakes that will minimize your power are an early release of the wrists in the downswing and moving your upper body onto your left side.


An absolute key to hitting powerful drives is storing energy in the downswing. A bent right elbow and cocked wrists are a sign that that’s happening. 

The Downswing
Now it’s time to store power! Your weight should shift left with your lower body onto your left heel while your head maintains its position. This is vital to achieving the power you’re looking for! As your weight shifts left and your right elbow comes into your side, you should feel you’re saving energy in the clubhead and shaft that soon will be unleashed into the golf ball. There are a couple of common errors that you can look for if you continue to struggle with distance. One error is allowing your upper body to follow your lower body onto your left side. If this takes place, you’ll most certainly swing down too much into impact, costing you the launch conditions you’re striving for. A second common error is unhinging the wrists too early in an attempt to add power to the swing. If you want to achieve a lot of power, your wrists and right elbow must wait their turn to deliver their speed! Practice the downswing repeatedly, allowing your weight to shift left while your head remains in the same position it held at the top of the swing. Try to let your right elbow and wrists remain passive as you make your initial shift onto your left side—this will help you store even more power. It will create a different sensation than you’re used to, but it’s a good one.

An efficient release of the clubhead allows all the power you’ve stored to flow freely into
the golf ball.

The Release
For this article’s purposes, the release is defined as the straightening of the right elbow and uncocking of the wrists. Notice in the photo how my right arm is in line with the shaft of my driver. This is a full release with nothing being held back. In the downswing, my right elbow maintained its flex and my wrists remained cocked. As I reach impact, it’s time to unleash the power! Notice how my head remains well back, ensuring an upward strike. When you get the angle of approach correct and unleash your stored energy, you’ll have all the power you need.

GT Senior Instruction Editor Chuck Winstead teaches at the University Club in Baton Rouge, La.

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