Golf Lessons: Lowering Your Score Washington DC

There’s little doubt that proper swing fundamentals and short-game techniques are important parts of a consistent golf game. Good golf, however, isn’t purely about perfect mechanics; it’s also largely about strategy. Fortunately, there are several key strategies anyone can easily utilize to produce lower scores.

University of Maryland Junior Golf Camp
(301) 403-4181
University of Maryland Golf Course
College Park, MD
 
4 Star Summer Camps at the University of Virginia
(800) 334-7827
PO Box 3387
Falls Church, VA
 
Turfgrass Trends
1775 T Street NW
Washington, DC
 
Landscape Architecture Magazine 
(202) 686-2752
4401 Connecticut Avenue
NW Washington, DC
 
East Potomac Public Golf Course -Red
202/554-7660
970 Ohio Dr Sw
Washington , DC
Type
Public
# of Holes
9

Data Provided by:
University of Maryland Junior Golf Camp
(301) 403-4181
University of Maryland Golf Course
College Park, MD
 
4 Star Summer Camps at the University of Virginia
(800) 334-7827
PO Box 3387
Falls Church, VA
 
East Potomac Golf Course
(202) 554-7660
972 Ohio Dr SW
Washington, DC
 
Ft. Mcnair Golf Course
202/685-3138
262 3rd Ave Sw Sports Center
Fort Mcnair , DC
Type
Military
# of Holes
9

Data Provided by:
East Potomac Public Golf Course -Blue
202/554-7660
970 Ohio Dr Sw
Washington , DC
Type
Public
# of Holes
18

Data Provided by:
Data Provided by:

Five Strategies for Lower Scores

Five Strategies For Lower Scores

Change your game without changing your swing

Five Strategies For Lower ScoresThere’s little doubt that proper swing fundamentals and short-game techniques are important parts of a consistent golf game. Good golf, however, isn’t purely about perfect mechanics; it’s also largely about strategy. Fortunately, there are several key strategies anyone can easily utilize to produce lower scores. Better yet, using your smarts is a lot easier than trying to create a fundamentally perfect backswing or impact position. In this regard, the title of this story holds true—you can score better without changing your swing.

Below are five nontechnical techniques you can employ to achieve more consistent results the next time you step on the course. They encompass the areas of shot and target selection, tension-free mechanics, tempo and rhythm, mental toughness and score-saving (rather than pride-saving) decision making. If you can master these strategic musts, you’ll be well on your way to a decent round even if your swing isn’t in tip-top shape. And when it is, watch out!

1. Hit To The Fat Part Of The Green
Far too many golfers aim for the pin without considering its location on the green. Better golfers understand the importance of playing to their ability and, therefore, think twice before firing at a pin that’s tucked near the edge of the green. This may not leave them with a better chance for birdie, but certainly lessens the chance for bogey or worse.

To make better decisions concerning when and when not to go for the flag, divide your clubs into three categories: 1) “play it safe,” 2) “proceed with caution” and 3) “go for it.” The clubs in the “play it safe” category are your fairway woods and long irons. For most golfers, these are the clubs that present the greatest challenge when it comes to consistently controlling distance and direction. Therefore, when you have a shot to the green that puts a fairway wood or long iron in your hands, always “play it safe” by aiming at the middle of the green. “Proceed with caution” with the clubs that are toward the middle of the set (5-iron through 8-iron). These clubs require a judgment call on your part based on how you’re swinging on a given day. If you’re swinging well and feeling confident, you can be more aggressive if you have a mid-iron in your hands. If you’re a little off, take a more conservative approach and aim for the fat part of the green. Most golfers are the most accurate with their short irons, which are the “go for it” clubs. If you have a wedge distance to the flag, be unafraid in taking a more aggressive line to your target.

Play Golf2. Play Golf, Not Golf Swing
One of the biggest and most common mistakes golfers make during the course of a round is spending too much time focusing on their mechanics. Don’t let yourself fall into this trap. When you tinker with your swing during a round of golf, not only do your mechanics tend to get worse, but you also lose sight of your...

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Golf Tips: 4=8

4=8

Four shots that will save you eight strokes

4=8
All players like to pull out the driver and hit it hard, but it’s not a great way to lower your scores, particularly if you tend to slice. Instead, try choosing your 3-wood and teeing the ball down a bit. The greater loft will help you keep the ball in play.
I call it The New Math, but you can think of it as a simple way to cut strokes from your scorecard quickly and easily. As an instructor, I like to teach my students the basic premise that by adding to their technical repertoire and eliminating incorrect moves, they can effectively lower their handicaps. In other words, I believe that a good instructor subtracts as much, if not more, than they add. By eliminating inefficient and wasted motion and streamlining your technique, you’ll be making a giant first step toward improving your swing and your scores.

Not everything in the “add and subtract” method is highly technical. In fact, many of the techniques are relatively basic but are elements that players often overlook or simply don’t understand. From course management to club selection to putting performance, every element of the game can be simplified to make it easier. Pay close attention to the drills I recommend, as well as the techniques I demonstrate for short-game performance. Take my advice and learn to add and subtract properly, and your scores will go down in no time.

Save 2 Strokes, Avoid Hazards With Your 3-Wood

4=8
4=8
When there’s trouble up the right side of the fairway, leave the driver in the bag and choose your 3-wood instead. Tee the ball on the right side of the tee box and aim away from the trouble, and even if you do hit a slice, your ball will avoid the hazard.
The first weapon I suggest adding to your arsenal that I guarantee will save you strokes immediately is a simple course-management strategy. Most recreational golfers share one common fault and that’s the tendency to slice, particularly off the tee with a driver. This is no surprise considering that the driver is the lowest-lofted and longest club in the bag, making it the most difficult to square through impact. I know today’s drivers are better than ever, featuring higher MOI and COR, as well as extremely large clubfaces. However, I strongly suggest playing the 3-wood (or your longest fairway wood) on just about any driving hole that features trouble on the right side of the fairway. The added loft of a 3-wood helps create more backspin, which effectively counteracts the sidespin that typically causes a slice. In addition, the significantly shorter length (most drivers are about 45 inches in length, while 3-woods are typically closer to 43.5 inches) makes it much easier to make a balanced swing and more solid contact. Avoid penalty strokes and get the ball in play more often, and you’ll probably save a lot more than two strokes per round.

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Rethink Your Game

Rethink Your Game

How do you really lower your scores? A change of approach can lead to a favorable change in score

Rethink Your GameMany of you scour the pages of this magazine looking for the magic answer to this question. If that’s your motivation, then this article is for you. On the following pages, I’ll show you how to drop strokes from your game by simply changing your approach on the tee box and on the putting green. After all, if you can get down the fairway regularly and hole the putts you’re supposed to make—and some of the ones you shouldn’t—you’ll be well on your way to playing your best rounds ever.

Drive For Show And For Dough
I’m sure you’ve heard the phrase “drive for show and putt for dough.” While this adage may be appropriate for the players on the professional tours, most amateurs would be better off by making the drive their money shot. How much fun is it anyway if you’re putting for 5 or 6 because your tee ball found water or landed out of bounds? The first step toward better scores is improving your long game. Here’s how.

Choose The Safer ClubChoose The Safer Club
Simply getting the ball in play off the tee far outweighs hitting the ball a long way, but into trouble. More often than not, you can lower your scores by choosing to play a club off the tee that may not give you the most distance, but puts you into play. A good alternative to the driver is the 3-wood, which features more loft than the driver (up to six degrees). This extra loft imparts more backspin on your ball, which works to lessen the amount of sidespin you’d create with the same swing with the driver. The end result is a shot that curves less and is in play more often.

Alter Your Aim
Selecting the appropriate place on the teeing ground and aiming away from trouble will also help in saving penalty shots (not to mention golf balls!). The simple rule of thumb is that if there’s trouble on the right, tee the ball on the right side of the tee box and aim up the left side of the fairway. Do the opposite if there’s trouble left. While this strategy may appear to be an “escape route,” you’ll nonetheless see pros do it all the time when the heat of a match starts to rise.

Swing On The Correct Path Swing On The Correct Path
The appropriate path on which you should swing any golf club is dictated by the lie angle of that club. Because the lie angles of woods are much flatter than those built into irons and wedges, they require a flatter approach into the back of the ball to produce successful results. This can be achieved by swinging the clubhead into the ball from inside the target line. If you come into the Lag Putting ball on a plane that’s much steeper than the lie angle of your wood, or from outside the target line, you’ll endure more than your fair share of wayward shots.

Set Up Correctly
The ability to swing the clubhead into the ball correctly is greatly influenced by the way you set up at address. To ensure a proper setup, tilt your spine slightly away from the target and position your...

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