Golf Lessons: Knees Washington DC

Everyone knows that the golf swing is both an around and up-and-down motion. Where the around part is considered, your right knee (left for left-handers) plays a critical role in that it serves as the hub around which your body turns both back and through.

University of Maryland Junior Golf Camp
(301) 403-4181
University of Maryland Golf Course
College Park, MD
 
4 Star Summer Camps at the University of Virginia
(800) 334-7827
PO Box 3387
Falls Church, VA
 
Turfgrass Trends
1775 T Street NW
Washington, DC
 
Langston Course & D.R.
(202) 397-8638
2600 Benning Rd NE
Washington, DC
 
Langston Golf Course & Driving Range
202/397-8638
2600 Benning Rd Ne
Washington , DC
Type
Public
# of Holes
18

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University of Maryland Junior Golf Camp
(301) 403-4181
University of Maryland Golf Course
College Park, MD
 
4 Star Summer Camps at the University of Virginia
(800) 334-7827
PO Box 3387
Falls Church, VA
 
East Potomac Golf Course
(202) 554-7660
972 Ohio Dr SW
Washington, DC
 
East Potomac Public Golf Course -Red
202/554-7660
970 Ohio Dr Sw
Washington , DC
Type
Public
# of Holes
9

Data Provided by:
Ft. Mcnair Golf Course
202/685-3138
262 3rd Ave Sw Sports Center
Fort Mcnair , DC
Type
Military
# of Holes
9

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Swing Extremes: Knee Action

Swing Extremes: Knee Action

Correct KneesIn order to deliver the golf club powerfully into the back of the golf ball, you must maintain a firm base with your lower body and create a powerful backswing coil. This coil results by turning the upper body against the resistance of the lower body. Good players facilitate the creation of coil by maintaining the gap between the knees on the backswing (right). They unleash the energy stored in the coil by closing the gap on the downswing.

A typical high-handicap player tends to do the opposite. He or she rotates the upper and lower body together, so that the left knee swings toward the right (for a right-handed golfer). In some instances, the left foot may even come off the ground. This creates a reverse weight shift and provides no stability for the lower body. From this position, the golfer is unable to execute a proper weight shift and will end up finishing the swing with most of his or her weight on the back foot, so the knees never touch on the followthrough. These errors result in the clubhead approaching the ball on an outside path.

Are you guilty of these errors? Make a practice swing in front of a mirror. If the gap between your knees closes on the backspin but widens on the downswing, you’re doing the exact opposite of what needs to occur.

Knee Action DrillKnee Action Drill
If you lack power or can never achieve balance when you finish your swing, try this drill.

Place a soccer or beach ball between your knees and simply squeeze it and keep it there as you coil your upper body on the backswing. This will help to remind you of the sensation of keeping the distance between your knees constant all the way up to the top of your swing, and encourage strong leg action and a powerful backswing coil. Once you complete the backswing, initiate the downswing with your lower body by moving your forward knee toward the target. Your legs should take on a squat or sit-down look, and the ball should fall from your knees.

As your arms drop, simply push off of your right foot and swing to the finish. If you perform the drill correctly, you can’t help but finish in balance. Use this drill to help remind you to create a gap between the knees on the backswing and to close the gap on the downswing. That’s what the pros do.

Class-A LPGA professional Karen Palacios-Jansen is the director of instruction for Swing Blade Golf ( swingbladegolf.com ).

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The Key Ingredient

The Key Ingredient

For greater consistency and power, control that right knee

The Key Ingredients 
The golf swing’s a funny thing. Sometimes it’s racked with errors, yet somehow, at impact, everything is where it needs to be and the ball shoots off powerfully in the direction you intended. Other times, every shift, angle and hinge is perfect, yet a small misstep on the way to the ball results in shots that can only be described as horrific. In the first instance, Lady Luck is certainly on your side, but as we all know, she rarely hangs around for too long. And the fact that a single hiccup can bring your whole technique crashing down is, to put it bluntly, just the way golf is.

I’ve been teaching golf for over 50 years, and one of the most damaging errors I’ve seen consistently throughout this period of time is knee movement, specifically, a straightening of the right knee on the backswing. This seemingly innocent mistake gives the golfer almost zero chance of making a quality pass at the ball and fuels both flawed backswings and downswings. As you’ll soon learn, however, correctly managing right knee movement makes producing a fundamentally sound motion a fairly easy task. Truly, it’s a key ingredient to any good swing.

Knee Keys In
Everyone knows that the golf swing is both an around and up-and-down motion. Where the around part is considered, your right knee (left for left-handers) plays a critical role in that it serves as the hub around which your body turns both back and through. The only way it can successfully serve as this hub (and facilitate appropriate weight shift, as we’ll soon discuss) is if it remains flexed.

Correct A flexed right knee throughout the backswing facilitates coil, the needed separation between the upper and lower body that creates potential energy that’s eventually released into the back of the golf ball. A flexed right knee braces the lower body, stopping its turn while allowing the upper body to perform its full rotation. Also, the flexed right knee affords the stability needed to transfer weight to your right side on the backswing and position it in your right hip at the top. Furthermore, the flexed knee position keeps the clubshaft on the appropriate backswing plane, established by the arrangement of your arms and club at address.

If and when the right knee flex is lost, as is the case with so many amateur swings, weight is thrown from the right side back to the left (reverse pivot). That’s a big no-no. Second, straightening the knee moves the backswing plane to the inside, which can lead to all kinds of downswing misery. Third, losing the right knee flex gives your lower body too much room to turn, in addition to allowing it to sway away from the ball on the backswing. As a result, you lose all of your coil. Potential energy is nil, and all you’re left with power-wise is what you can generate by moving your arms as fast as you can back down to the ball. It’s an unleveraged motion that’s both weak and inconsistent...

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