Golf Lessons: Impact Beatrice NE

All good players have one position in the golf swing that’s similar despite their very different-looking swings. This position is impact. Good players retain their wrist-cock through the hitting area so that their left wrist is bowed and the right wrist is flexed (for right-handed golfers), and both hands are slightly in front of the golf ball at the strike.

Beatrice Country Club
402/223-2710
13th & Oak St
Beatrice , NE
Type
Private
# of Holes
18
Course Architect
Tom Bendelow

Data Provided by:
Tim Nelson
(402) 592-7788
Eagle Hills Golf Course
Papillion, NE
Started Teaching
1967
Gender
Male
Professional Affiliation
PGA
Price Information
Hourly Rate: $45.00
Junior Rate: $25.00
Video Rate: $45.00
Playing Rate: $60.00

Matthew W. Shaner
(402) 441-8960
Holmes Park Golf Course
Lincoln, NE
Started Teaching
1995
Gender
Male
Professional Affiliation
PGA
Price Information
Hourly Rate: $35.00
Junior Rate: $20.00
Clinic Rate: $50.00
Playing Rate: $50.00

Patrick Kilbride
(402) 333-0500
Shadow Ridge Country Club
Omaha, NE
Started Teaching
1992
Gender
Male
Professional Affiliation
PGA
Price Information
Hourly Rate: $70.00
Junior Rate: $20.00
Clinic Rate: $250.00
Video Rate: $70.00
Playing Rate: $130.00

Todd Anderson
(402) 498-0220
Miracle Hill
Omaha, NE
Started Teaching
1991
Gender
Male
Professional Affiliation
PGA
Price Information
Hourly Rate: $45.00
Junior Rate: $30.00
Clinic Rate: $20.00
Playing Rate: $75.00

Hidden Acres Golf Course
402/228-2146
Route 2
Beatrice , NE
Type
Semi-Private
# of Holes
18
Course Architect
Marty Johnson

Data Provided by:
James Sieckmann
(402) 333-1100
Shadow Ridge Golf Academy
Omaha, NE
Started Teaching
1990
Gender
Male
Professional Affiliation
PGA
Price Information
Hourly Rate: $90.00
Clinic Rate: $300.00
Video Rate: $90.00
Playing Rate: $150.00

Mike Higgins
(402) 660-0274
The Champions Club
Omaha, NE
Started Teaching
1987
Gender
Male
Professional Affiliation
PGA
Price Information
Hourly Rate: $60.00
Junior Rate: $30.00
Video Rate: $75.00
Playing Rate: $100.00

Lou Ann Herstead
(800) 858-9633
Craft Zavichas Golf School
Scottsbluff, NE
Started Teaching
1985
Gender
Female
Professional Affiliation
PGA / LPGA

Glen Blakeman
(402) 371-5108
John Jacobs Golf Schools
Norfolk, NE
Gender
Male
Professional Affiliation
PGA

Data Provided by:

Square at Impact is a Myth

Square At Impact Is A Myth

Square at Impact Believe it or not, the long-held belief that the clubface must be square through the hitting zone to hit straight shots is a myth. Over the past 10 years, I’ve measured the activity of the clubface during Tour players’ swings through the impact zone, and what I’ve learned is that not a single player holds the clubface square during the hitting area. Not one! In fact, these top-level players rotate the face counterclockwise around the shaft (for right-handed players) at about 30 degrees per foot of linear motion forward.

Put another way, the clubface is 30 degrees open 12 inches from the center of the ball before impact and 30 degrees closed 12 inches past where the center of the ball was after impact. This means that the clubface is only square when it reaches a point somewhere near the center of the golf ball. It also means that when the clubface first touches the ball, it’s actually open instead of square.

If your clubface is square when it first touches the ball, and you correctly allow the clubface to rotate six degrees counterclockwise, you’ll get a six-degree hook that starts left of the target and hooks further left. In contrast, if the club touches the ball with the face six degrees open, it will apply an initial six-degree slice rotation. This will be negated, however, by the six-degree hook rotation applied during the deformation phase. The result is sidespin of net zero and a straight shot.

If you strike the ball with the face anywhere in the three- to nine-degree open range, you’ll hit a perfectly acceptable golf shot. It should be reassuring to know that a six-degree variation at impact will produce decent results. In measuring Tour players’ face angles at impact, I found a five-degree variation, shot to shot.

Put these new concepts to the test the next time you visit the range. Address the ball with the face six to 10 degrees open, instead of square. Turn the shaft counterclockwise through the impact zone and observe the resulting ballflight. If the ball flies left, you turned the face too soon. If it goes right, you turned the face too late. Keep hitting shots and observing ballflight until you have a sense of the face hitting the ball at the right time with the proper angle. Once you find the right amount of rotation for your swing, hitting accurate shots will become a lot easier.

Veteran teaching professional A.J. Bonar is the director of A.J. Golf School in Carlsbad, Calif.

Click here to read the rest of this article from Golf Tips Magazine

Swing Extremes: Impact Position

Swing Extremes: Impact Position

Correct Impact PositionAll good players have one position in the golf swing that’s similar despite their very different-looking swings. This position is impact. Good players retain their wrist-cock through the hitting area so that their left wrist is bowed and the right wrist is flexed (for right-handed golfers), and both hands are slightly in front of the golf ball at the strike. This is often called a late hit or clubhead lag, and good players use both to create a tremendous amount of clubhead speed and power in their swings.

High-handicappers tend to do the opposite at impact. Instead of a late hit, they actually execute what’s called an early release. They scoop the ball at impact because they lose the lag too early in the downswing. Instead of having a bowed left wrist and their hands ahead of the ball at impact, they have a collapsed left wrist and their hands are behind the ball. As such, they suffer a tremendous loss of power and direction and end up with a very weak hit. Golfers with this problem tend to hit the ball better with their woods than their irons because the ball is teed up and they can get away with scooping or hitting up on the ball. In order to hit solid irons shots and better drives more consistently, however, it’s necessary to hit down with a flat left wrist that’s ahead of the ball at impact.

To create a late hit, you must sequence the swing so that your hands, wrists and clubhead arrive at impact in the correct order. This is called sequencing.

Incorrect Impact PositionSequencing
First, check your left-hand grip (your right if you’re left-handed) to make sure that the club handle is held primarily in the fingers as opposed to the palm. When you look down at your grip, you should see at least two knuckles on your left hand at address. The V formed by the thumbs and forefingers on both hands should point to the right side of your face.

If you can’t see at least two knuckles, your grip is primarily in the palm, and this will make it difficult for you to create the necessary wrist hinge for a late hit at impact.

Second, as you swing back, allow your wrists to hinge naturally. To help create wrist hinge, imagine that there’s a hole in the butt end of the club and the shaft is full of water. As you swing back, pour the water out of the shaft onto your right leg. The wrists should be fully hinged by the time the left arm becomes parallel to the ground. This backswing wrist hinge must be duplicated in the downswing.

Third, as you start down, feel as if you’re leading with the butt end of the club. Try to maintain your wrist cocked as long as possible on the downswing before allowing the clubhead to whip through impact. Think of impact as a finish line to a race. Your left hand should come in first place, the right hand should come in second, and the clubhead should come in third. If you let the clubhead win the race, you’ll fail to achieve the correct impact position.

To ingrain the feel of this position,...

Click here to read the rest of this article from Golf Tips Magazine