Golf Lessons: Hybrids Washington DC

Hybrid clubs are incredibly useful, so long as you know how to swing one. You'd be surprised at how many golfers have hopes of making use of these versatile clubs, often with no clue of how—or of what the hybrid was designed to do in the first place.

University of Maryland Junior Golf Camp
(301) 403-4181
University of Maryland Golf Course
College Park, MD
 
4 Star Summer Camps at the University of Virginia
(800) 334-7827
PO Box 3387
Falls Church, VA
 
Turfgrass Trends
1775 T Street NW
Washington, DC
 
East Potomac Public Golf Course -Blue
202/554-7660
970 Ohio Dr Sw
Washington , DC
Type
Public
# of Holes
18

Data Provided by:
East Potomac Public Golf Course -White
202/554-7660
970 Ohio Dr Sw
Washington , DC
Type
Public
# of Holes
9

Data Provided by:
University of Maryland Junior Golf Camp
(301) 403-4181
University of Maryland Golf Course
College Park, MD
 
4 Star Summer Camps at the University of Virginia
(800) 334-7827
PO Box 3387
Falls Church, VA
 
East Potomac Public Golf Course -Red
202/554-7660
970 Ohio Dr Sw
Washington , DC
Type
Public
# of Holes
9

Data Provided by:
Langston Golf Course & Driving Range
202/397-8638
2600 Benning Rd Ne
Washington , DC
Type
Public
# of Holes
18

Data Provided by:
East Potomac Golf Course
(202) 554-7660
972 Ohio Dr SW
Washington, DC
 
Data Provided by:

Hybrid Basics

Hybrid Basics

Learn how to hit your utility club

Hybrid clubs are incredibly useful, so long as you know how to swing one. You’d be surprised at how many golfers come to me with hopes of making use of these versatile clubs, often with no clue of how—or of what the hybrid was designed to do in the first place.

To clear up misconceptions about hybrids, as well as how to swing one, let’s look at what hybrids are designed to do. In most cases, hybrids are designed not as fairway-wood replacements but as long-iron replacements. This isn’t the case across the board, but to know for certain, check out the design of your hybrid. If it looks more like a wood, then it’s better suited for a wood-like swing. There aren’t many hybrids like that; most hybrids on the market have iron-like features, meaning these babies are better suited to swing like an iron. That’s what this quick primer is about.

BALL Position: Use your 3- or 4-iron as a guide

SETUP

For starters, let’s get your address position corrected. The right ball position for your hybrid is just a smidge forward of your 3- or 4-iron. The goal is to position the ball just in front of the lowest point of your swing arc. And by “in front of the lowest point,” I mean you want to hit down on the ball with your hybrid. It’s not made to scoop! Second, the distance from you and the golf ball should change. This means moving away from the ball, about an inch or so. To get more specific, check your hybrid’s length with your long iron. If it’s an inch longer, then stand an inch farther from the ball.

Hybrid Iron Or Wood?

What is a hybrid, exactly? Most hybrids are designed to be replacement clubs for those hard-to-hit long irons, but that's not true with all models. The easiest way to determine if your hybrids require more of a wood-like swing or an iron-like swing is to check the design of the face. If the face looks like an iron, then it’s meant to be swung more like an iron. If it has a more rounded profile and looks more like a wood, the club might perform better for you if you have a slightly shallower angle of attack. Now be careful, no matter what, a hybrid is not a fairway wood, and in most cases, your steeper iron swing will prevail. But if you have hybrids that look more like woods, don’t be afraid to make a lower and longer golf swing.
—Staff Report

Click here to read the rest of this article from Golf Tips Magazine

Hybrid Chips

Hybrid Chips

Hybrid ChipsOkay, so you’ve missed the green by a few feet and are left with a fluffy, unpredictable lie. Situations like this aren’t uncommon here at Poipu Bay in Kauai (and probably your home course too), but with a quick pointer on greenside chipping, I think I can help you get up and down more often than not from this tricky position. How? With the most versatile and forgiving club in your bag.

When you miss the green and find yourself with a tight, fluffy or unpredictable lie near the green, ditch the wedge for a hybrid club (if you’re one of the few not using a hybrid club, try a high-lofted fairway wood). The hybrid, which has become known for its remarkable versatility, can help you hit a shot that produces the same result, no matter what the lie. A wedge, however, may pop the ball up high, promote roll or cause the ball to check up. (Or worse yet, in a fluffy lie like I have here, the wedge can slip completely under the ball, causing an embarrassing flubbed shot.) With the hybrid, you can almost always guarantee the ball will get airborne a few inches and immediately start rolling toward the target.

To hit this shot—no matter what the lie—simply adopt your putting stance. Choke down on the shaft to a comfortable position, place the ball and your weight slightly forward of center in your stance and glide the clubhead across the grass as you would with a putter. The thick sole and low weighting of the hybrid will help brush through the turf with the needed momentum to prevent a flubbed shot, and the enlarged sweet spot will minimize twisting and distance loss should you hit the ball slightly on the heel or toe.

First Aid When you’re ready, make a putting stroke and be sure to play for plenty of roll, as the ball will get airborne momentarily and begin rolling in a hurry. (This shot tends to be more effective with at least 10 yards of green between you and the hole.) Remember to read the green as you would a putt, and play the break. With some practice and experimentation, you’ll soon find using the hybrid to be one of the most effective ways to get the ball close from off the green. Mahalo!

Craig Sasada, PGA, is Director of Golf at the beautiful Poipu Bay Golf Resort on the island of Kauai, Hawaii. For more on the resort, as well as all of Kauai, visit www.kauaidiscovery.com and www.poipubay.com .

Click here to read the rest of this article from Golf Tips Magazine