Golf Lessons: Hands Beatrice NE

If you have tension in your hands and arms, you’ll end up dragging the clubhead through the hitting zone. Adopting a tension-free hold is the way to grip every club in your bag.

Beatrice Country Club
402/223-2710
13th & Oak St
Beatrice , NE
Type
Private
# of Holes
18
Course Architect
Tom Bendelow

Data Provided by:
Mike Higgins
(402) 660-0274
The Champions Club
Omaha, NE
Started Teaching
1987
Gender
Male
Professional Affiliation
PGA
Price Information
Hourly Rate: $60.00
Junior Rate: $30.00
Video Rate: $75.00
Playing Rate: $100.00

Patrick Kilbride
(402) 333-0500
Shadow Ridge Country Club
Omaha, NE
Started Teaching
1992
Gender
Male
Professional Affiliation
PGA
Price Information
Hourly Rate: $70.00
Junior Rate: $20.00
Clinic Rate: $250.00
Video Rate: $70.00
Playing Rate: $130.00

Todd Anderson
(402) 498-0220
Miracle Hill
Omaha, NE
Started Teaching
1991
Gender
Male
Professional Affiliation
PGA
Price Information
Hourly Rate: $45.00
Junior Rate: $30.00
Clinic Rate: $20.00
Playing Rate: $75.00

Tim Nelson
(402) 592-7788
Eagle Hills Golf Course
Papillion, NE
Started Teaching
1967
Gender
Male
Professional Affiliation
PGA
Price Information
Hourly Rate: $45.00
Junior Rate: $25.00
Video Rate: $45.00
Playing Rate: $60.00

Hidden Acres Golf Course
402/228-2146
Route 2
Beatrice , NE
Type
Semi-Private
# of Holes
18
Course Architect
Marty Johnson

Data Provided by:
Tom Erlandson
(402) 475-4653
Woodland Hills Golf Course
Eagle, NE
Started Teaching
1989
Gender
Male
Professional Affiliation
PGA
Price Information
Hourly Rate: $50.00
Junior Rate: $25.00
Clinic Rate: $75.00
Video Rate: $65.00
Playing Rate: $75.00
Accepts Lesson Gift Certificates

James Sieckmann
(402) 333-1100
Shadow Ridge Golf Academy
Omaha, NE
Started Teaching
1990
Gender
Male
Professional Affiliation
PGA
Price Information
Hourly Rate: $90.00
Clinic Rate: $300.00
Video Rate: $90.00
Playing Rate: $150.00

Lou Ann Herstead
(800) 858-9633
Craft Zavichas Golf School
Scottsbluff, NE
Started Teaching
1985
Gender
Female
Professional Affiliation
PGA / LPGA

Jim White
(402) 421-2525
Wilderness Ridge Golf Club
Lincoln, NE
Started Teaching
1972
Gender
Male
Professional Affiliation
PGA
Price Information
Hourly Rate: $65.00
Junior Rate: $20.00
Clinic Rate: $50.00
Video Rate: $35.00
Playing Rate: $80.00

Data Provided by:

Squeeze and Let Go

Squeeze And Let Go

GripOver the years, much has been written about grip pressure and what this level of pressure feels like. This has been a difficult task for instructors because how can you aptly describe what something feels like?

In this lesson, I’ll give you something more than a description of what correct grip pressure feels like. Take any club and squeeze it as tight as you can. That’s it—strangle that club handle. Give it the “death grip.” Take your normal address position, continuing to give the club a good squeeze. Now, just before you feel ready to take the club back to start your backswing, relax your hands. Let all the tension run from your fingers and your arms. Do you feel a “softness” in your hands now? If you do, that’s what correct grip pressure feels like. This tension-free grip is what allows good golfers to swing with rhythm and in good tempo. It results in the golfer being able to snap, or sling, the clubhead at the bottom of the golf swing, which is how a golf ball should be struck.

If you have tension in your hands and arms, you’ll end up dragging the clubhead through the hitting zone. Adopting a tension-free hold is the way to grip every club in your bag. Use this tip on the course the next time you feel tension setting in. Soon, you’ll again sense the release and power in your swing. Tension is the number-one killer of the golf swing—let it out with a good squeeze.

Professional golf instructor Barry Goldstein is the director of golf at Polar Shot Golf Center in Johnson City, N.Y. He also instructs at the Coral Springs Golf Range in Coral Springs, Fla.

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Triple Overlap

Triple Overlap


Triple Overlap One of the most common causes of bad pitches and chips is the dominant hand (right for righties) taking over  the swing. The result is typically scooped or thin contact that produces fat or sculled shots. To alleviate this tendency, learn to make your hands work together by experimenting with the triple-overlap grip. This technique effectively takes the dominant hand out of the swing, and promotes a descending blow, which is absolutely critical to creating crisp contact and consistent results.

Triple Overlap

When the hands aren’t working together properly in the golf swing, it’s usually the lower hand (right hand for right-handers) that attempts to make up for it by trying to lift the ball into the air. Rarely, if ever, does the lower hand produce a good result, especially when it comes to delicate chips and pitches around the green. Instead, the lower hand forces the clubhead too far ahead of the arms, en route to producing a skulled or flubbed shot. The key to hitting chips and pitches while completely avoiding the dreaded right hand-dominated flub or skulled shot is to grip the club in a way that limits the right hand’s involvement as much as possible. To do just that, I like to prescribe to my students what I call the triple-overlap grip.

To use this grip, first make sure you set up to the ball correctly. With a slightly narrow stance, position the ball two inches inside your front heel. Your top hand and club should form a straight line from your shoulder to the ball. Lean your upper body toward the target so you have at least 60 to 70 percent of your weight over your front leg. From this position, you’re ready to work in the triple overlap.

Take your normal full-swing grip. Then take your bottom hand (right for righties, left for lefties) and reposition it over your upper hand so that you overlap your pinkie, ring and middle fingers on your top hand. Back away from the ball and try some practice swings, making no more than knee-high backswings and knee-high followthroughs. Remember, this grip is intended for shots within 40 yards. Any farther away will require a standard grip.

Pay attention to how your hands (specifically your upper hand) lead the clubhead while using the triple-overlap grip. With your weight on your forward foot, you’ll be inclined to strike the ball with a downward blow, just as you should with all chips and pitches, and the triple overlap will help guard against the right hand dominating the downswing and flipping the club over too soon. After a few practice strokes, give it a shot. You’ll instantly notice how much more effectively both hands work together as a unit.

Plain and simple, the triple-overlap grip works great around the green and is equally effective when it’s time to make a few putts as well!

PGA professional John O’Leary III is the director of instruction at Arnold Palmer’s Bay Hill Club & Lodge ( www.b...

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