Golf Lessons: Grip Washington DC

there are common elements to good putting grips that enable the golfer to consistently strike the ball in the center of the putterface. One of these elements is gripping the putter with the palms, rather than the fingers.

University of Maryland Junior Golf Camp
(301) 403-4181
University of Maryland Golf Course
College Park, MD
 
4 Star Summer Camps at the University of Virginia
(800) 334-7827
PO Box 3387
Falls Church, VA
 
Turfgrass Trends
1775 T Street NW
Washington, DC
 
Landscape Architecture Magazine 
(202) 686-2752
4401 Connecticut Avenue
NW Washington, DC
 
Ft. Mcnair Golf Course
202/685-3138
262 3rd Ave Sw Sports Center
Fort Mcnair , DC
Type
Military
# of Holes
9

Data Provided by:
University of Maryland Junior Golf Camp
(301) 403-4181
University of Maryland Golf Course
College Park, MD
 
4 Star Summer Camps at the University of Virginia
(800) 334-7827
PO Box 3387
Falls Church, VA
 
East Potomac Public Golf Course -White
202/554-7660
970 Ohio Dr Sw
Washington , DC
Type
Public
# of Holes
9

Data Provided by:
Langston Golf Course & Driving Range
202/397-8638
2600 Benning Rd Ne
Washington , DC
Type
Public
# of Holes
18

Data Provided by:
East Potomac Public Golf Course -Blue
202/554-7660
970 Ohio Dr Sw
Washington , DC
Type
Public
# of Holes
18

Data Provided by:
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A Gripping Adjustment

A Gripping Adjustment

Gripping Adjustment

The keys to great putting are really pretty simple. You must hit the ball squarely with the putterface, keep the putterhead moving level to the ground and square to your target line, and swing the putter at the proper speed to roll the ball the desired distance. To accomplish this more consistently, I recommend a grip that’s a bit revolutionary, but extremely effective.

Position each hand so that your palms, if opened, would face upward and inward at 45-degree angles. In this position, each hand prevents the other from unduly opening or closing the clubface during the stroke. Grip pressure should be equal in both hands and constant throughout your stroke.

Now, bend your elbows until they’re at 45-degree angles to the shaft. This will enable you to move the putter back and forth on a steady, accurate plane and direction, allowing you to put the intended roll on the ball. Play the golf ball off of your forward foot, with your eyes positioned directly over the target line.

I advocate keeping your wrists very firm throughout the stroke. A good way to help you do this is to re-grip your putter with a grip designed with a flattened top, and place it on the putter’s shaft so that the flat side points toward the target. You’ll find this to be a great help in preventing your wrists from breaking down during the stroke. Also, make certain that the length of the putter allows the end of the putter’s handle to fit into the palm of your left hand (for right-handers), with the left thumb pressed firmly on the flat part of the grip.

You’ll find this grip technique to be helpful when chipping as well.

Former touring and teaching professional Al Wagner founded Diamondhead Golf Club Manufacturing Company.

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One Hand Control

One Hand Control

One Hand Control In everyday life, we rarely use both hands to accomplish a motor task. This is one of the reasons why putting with just one hand on the handle can yield positive results.

A drill I give many of my students who are having trouble getting the ball on line is to place a ball at a distance of no more than three to six feet from the hole. Your job is to attempt to make the putt with just your right hand on the putter handle. After attempting five to 10 putts with your right hand, repeat using just your left hand.

After the left-handed putts, note which hand is more of the control hand. This is the hand you felt more comfortable with or the one that got the ball in the hole the most consistently.

Often, it’s your dominant hand, which should be no surprise. There are a few golfers who feel the non-dominant hand (the left for right-handers) is better at controlling the ability to get the ball started on line. Whatever is the case, work to get both more capable of controlling the putterhead. If one hand is clearly the winner, it may not be prudent to spend much time on the other hand.

The point is that if you find you’re not getting the ball started on line out on the course, you may wish to grip the putter first with your control hand, then slide the other hand on as support and with a lighter grip pressure.

By using one hand as the control hand and the other as support, you should find that the challenge of eye-hand coordination is lessened. This, in turn, may reduce the number of mis-hits and allow the ball to start on line more frequently.

Dr. Craig Farnsworth is a sports vision specialist. He has trained some of the world’s elite golfers and athletes of all sports. Dr. Farnsworth directs the See and Score Golf School at the Hyatt Regency Lake Las Vegas Resort in Henderson, Nev. ( www.puttdoctor.com ).

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Try the Triple Grip

Try The Triple Grip


Try The Triple Grip The putting grip best represents the individuality of golf. On Tour, if there are 160 golfers playing in an event, you’ll find no less than 160 different putting grips.

Yet there are common elements to good putting grips that enable the golfer to consistently strike the ball in the center of the putterface. One of these elements is gripping the putter with the palms, rather than the fingers. If you grip your putter mostly with your fingers, you’ll give your wrists too much freedom to hinge and unhinge.

In putting, control and consistency are the keys. Gripping the club in your palms effectively takes your wrists out of play. As a result, your putterface will tend to stay on line and contact the ball consistently in the sweet spot.

If your current grip places too much of the handle in your fingers, you’ll need to adjust it so more of the grip fits in your palms. Furthermore, you should make a second alteration to ensure that your hands function as a single unit. Try this: After placing your hands on the putter’s handle, slide the lower hand up until the pinkie, forefinger and middle finger rest atop your lead hand. This triple overlap grip effectively quiets the movement of the dominant hand (the right hand for right-handed golfers) during the putting stroke. A less-active dominant side will translate into better grip pressure and keep the hands working together, a key requirement to keeping the putterhead moving along the target line.

Place the grip in your palms, not your fingers, to help prevent tension, and position your thumbs on top of the grip for better feel and control.

PGA professional Dan Pasquariello is recognized as one of the top 100 teachers in America. He instructs at the Pebble Beach Golf Academy in Pebble Beach, Calif.

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