Golf Lessons: Distance Washington DC

If your driving suffers from inconsistency and a lack of distance, you may be tied up with too many thoughts about swing mechanics. Free your mind at address and focus on a specific target in the fairway where you want the ball to land.

University of Maryland Junior Golf Camp
(301) 403-4181
University of Maryland Golf Course
College Park, MD
 
4 Star Summer Camps at the University of Virginia
(800) 334-7827
PO Box 3387
Falls Church, VA
 
Turfgrass Trends
1775 T Street NW
Washington, DC
 
East Potomac Golf Course
(202) 554-7660
972 Ohio Dr SW
Washington, DC
 
Langston Golf Course & Driving Range
202/397-8638
2600 Benning Rd Ne
Washington , DC
Type
Public
# of Holes
18

Data Provided by:
University of Maryland Junior Golf Camp
(301) 403-4181
University of Maryland Golf Course
College Park, MD
 
4 Star Summer Camps at the University of Virginia
(800) 334-7827
PO Box 3387
Falls Church, VA
 
Ft. Mcnair Golf Course
202/685-3138
262 3rd Ave Sw Sports Center
Fort Mcnair , DC
Type
Military
# of Holes
9

Data Provided by:
Landscape Architecture Magazine 
(202) 686-2752
4401 Connecticut Avenue
NW Washington, DC
 
East Potomac Public Golf Course -Red
202/554-7660
970 Ohio Dr Sw
Washington , DC
Type
Public
# of Holes
9

Data Provided by:
Data Provided by:

Reduce Spin, Add Distance

Reduce Spin, Add Distance

Power Tip Tour players are hitting the ball dramatically farther these days. Improvements in clubs and balls are contributing factors, but so is the fact that professionals have learned to reduce the amount of spin on their drives. Today’s players put in long hours finding ways to reduce backspin and create the optimal launch angle. Work on the tips below to take spin off your tee shots and hit longer, more penetrating drives.

Spin robs drives of their maximum distance. Golfers who can master the art of reducing spin on their tee shots will add extra yards to their drives. Here’s how to go about it.

First, tee the ball higher. Acquire some extra-long (23⁄4 inches) tees and peg the ball as high as possible. This promotes swinging up on the ball—rather than flat or, even worse, downward—and helps create launch angles of 10 degrees or higher and spin rates of 3,000 rpm and lower, proven to be the ideal launch conditions.

Second, never sole the driver at address. This will help promote an upward strike on the ball, too. It also increases a golfer’s chances of making contact with the clubface in the center or slightly above. Drives struck one or two grooves below the center of the clubface will have too much spin and a trajectory that starts low and then climbs.

Third, eliminate any downward action in the swing. To reduce spin and maximize distance, golfers need to adopt the uppercut swing of a home-run hitter in baseball, not the flat swing of a contact hitter.

Fourth, stay behind the ball. Any tendency to slide ahead of the ball at impact will lower the launch angle and create more spin. Stay down and through the shot at impact, swinging the club up, out and away from the body, not down and across it.

Two-time national long drive champion Art Sellinger is a member of the Pinnacle Distance Team. He uses the Cobra 427 in his power exhibitions and represents the Four Seasons Resort and Club, Las Colinas. Copies of Art’s Power Guarantee training system are available by calling (817) 329-8262 or visiting www.artoflongdriving.com .

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Three Keys to Longer Drives

Three Keys To Longer Drives

Three Keys To Longer DrivesIf your driving suffers from inconsistency and a lack of distance, you may be tied up with too many thoughts about swing mechanics.

Free your mind at address and focus on a specific target in the fairway where you want the ball to land. Then let your natural instincts take over. Swing the clubhead to that target, making an athletic move through the ball.

Such a focused, target-oriented approach should get you through any round of golf without major hiccups.

In practice sessions, work on these three keys for driving, which together will produce more consistency and distance when you go to the golf course.

1. Stay on plane. Work on building the proper path for your golf swing, one that doesn’t travel outside the line on the backswing or, as is more commonly the case for amateurs, one that doesn’t get tugged inside the line. On the downswing, work on directing the club slightly to the inside of the backswing plane. This path into the ball will produce optimal results.

2. Hit the sweet spot. Sounds simple, but most golfers fail to make contact with the golf ball in the center of the clubface. One of the major causes for off-center contact is overswinging. My advice is to gear down your swing until you begin making contact dead-center on the face of the driver. This is more important than an extra 10 mph of clubhead speed. Once you can hit balls flush, gradually begin adding speed to your swing, but not at the expense of poor contact.

3. Finish in balance. Take practice swings at half speed and concentrate on making a full finish that’s in balance, with the torso rotated toward the target and the weight on the front side. If necessary, make practice swings without a golf ball and simply rehearse this finish position. (Hint: If you can’t hold the finish position for several seconds, you’re not in balance.)

These three keys—staying on plane, hitting the sweet spot and finishing in balance—are cornerstones for solid drives. Incorporating them into your driving will lead to immediate improvement both in average distance and number of fairways hit.

Two-time national long drive champion Art Sellinger is the owner and CEO of Long Drivers of America (LDA), which conducts the RE/MAX World Long Drive Championship and the Pinnacle LDA Tour. He represents Four Seasons Resort and Club Dallas at Las Colinas, Texas, and Cobra Golf.

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Throttle Back

Throttle Back

Throttle Back I’d like to let readers in on a little secret that professional long drivers share among themselves: Maximum distance results from somewhat less than maximum effort. Trust me, I’ve been competing in the long drive arena for 20 years, and during that time, I’ve watched competitive long drivers post their best distances when they throttle back from an all-out assault on the ball. So will you.

When Sean Fister won the 2002 RE/MAX World Long Drive Championship, his one goal was to keep his swing under control. He focused on swinging at 85 percent of his top-end speed. Faced with the pressure of trying to win a world championship, Fister used that formula to unleash a sensational winning shot of more than 375 yards on the final ball of the event.

Driving with 85-percent effort, not your all-out max, promotes several positive things during your swing, one of which is maintaining balance. Golfers who immediately get out of balance by overswinging have to make compensations to correct the situation. Another benefit is solid contact. Golfers who swing at 85 percent have the best chance of catching the ball flush on the sweet spot of the driver. Also, swinging at 85 percent reduces tension in the body and allows fast-twitch muscles in the hands and arms to work.

Finally, your equipment actually works better when you swing at 85 percent. The properties of torque and flex built into the shafts of today’s drivers perform best when the club isn’t being swung as hard, or as violently, as possible.

Art Sellinger is a two-time National Long Drive champion and a member of the Pinnacle Distance Team. Art’s “Power Guarantee” training system is available by calling (817) 329-8262 or visiting www.artoflongdriving.com .

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Toss for Distance

Toss For Distance

Toss For DistanceHere’s a drill that transforms golfers into more consistent ballstrikers and longer hitters. The most remarkable aspect of this drill is that it doesn’t involve swinging a golf club at all, but I feel strongly it best teaches the athletic movements involved with swinging a club.

Pick up a golf ball, assume an imaginary address position and then toss the ball underhanded at a specific target no more than 10 yards away. Simulate a golf swing by making a weight transfer to the right as you wind up to toss, turning your back to the target and releasing the ball as you’d release the clubface at impact.

A golfer who slices will invariably make an underhanded toss to the left of the target. I’ve seen amateurs do it time after time; they fling their right arms across the body, mimicking the outside-to-in path of their golf swings. They also allow the right foot to spin out as they make the toss, instead of transferring their weight to their left foot.

Any golfer who can make the proper motion with the underhand toss—right arm folded in an “L” position at the top, right palm open at release, knees touching at the finish in good balance, the ball starting slightly right of the target—can incorporate the same athletic motion into his swing.

Art Sellinger represents the Four Seasons Resort and Club in Las Colinas, Texas.

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