Golf Lessons: Backswing Beatrice NE

One of the most common swing flaws occurs when golfers take the club too far inside the target line on the backswing. Usually, this move is caused by a backswing that's controlled by the hips and the dipping of the shoulders away from the ball. Read more.

Hidden Acres Golf Course
402/228-2146
Route 2
Beatrice , NE
Type
Semi-Private
# of Holes
18
Course Architect
Marty Johnson

Data Provided by:
Tom Erlandson
(402) 475-4653
Woodland Hills Golf Course
Eagle, NE
Started Teaching
1989
Gender
Male
Professional Affiliation
PGA
Price Information
Hourly Rate: $50.00
Junior Rate: $25.00
Clinic Rate: $75.00
Video Rate: $65.00
Playing Rate: $75.00
Accepts Lesson Gift Certificates

Tim Nelson
(402) 592-7788
Eagle Hills Golf Course
Papillion, NE
Started Teaching
1967
Gender
Male
Professional Affiliation
PGA
Price Information
Hourly Rate: $45.00
Junior Rate: $25.00
Video Rate: $45.00
Playing Rate: $60.00

Carol N-tzschke-Henrich
(402) 444-4656
Johnny Goodman Golf Course
Omaha, NE
Started Teaching
1985
Gender
Female
Professional Affiliation
PGA
Price Information
Junior Rate: $25.00
Playing Rate: $50.00

Mike Higgins
(402) 660-0274
The Champions Club
Omaha, NE
Started Teaching
1987
Gender
Male
Professional Affiliation
PGA
Price Information
Hourly Rate: $60.00
Junior Rate: $30.00
Video Rate: $75.00
Playing Rate: $100.00

Beatrice Country Club
402/223-2710
13th & Oak St
Beatrice , NE
Type
Private
# of Holes
18
Course Architect
Tom Bendelow

Data Provided by:
Lou Ann Herstead
(800) 858-9633
Craft Zavichas Golf School
Scottsbluff, NE
Started Teaching
1985
Gender
Female
Professional Affiliation
PGA / LPGA

Glen Blakeman
(402) 371-5108
John Jacobs Golf Schools
Norfolk, NE
Gender
Male
Professional Affiliation
PGA

James Sieckmann
(402) 333-1100
Shadow Ridge Golf Academy
Omaha, NE
Started Teaching
1990
Gender
Male
Professional Affiliation
PGA
Price Information
Hourly Rate: $90.00
Clinic Rate: $300.00
Video Rate: $90.00
Playing Rate: $150.00

Patrick Kilbride
(402) 333-0500
Shadow Ridge Country Club
Omaha, NE
Started Teaching
1992
Gender
Male
Professional Affiliation
PGA
Price Information
Hourly Rate: $70.00
Junior Rate: $20.00
Clinic Rate: $250.00
Video Rate: $70.00
Playing Rate: $130.00

Data Provided by:

Back to the Wall

Back To The Wall

Hit more fairways with a correct swing path


Back To The WallOne of the most common swing flaws occurs when golfers take the club too far inside the target line on the backswing. Usually, this move is caused by a backswing that’s controlled by the hips and the dipping of the shoulders away from the ball. And, as you may guess, this move leads to a handful of bad shots, including pushes, topped shots, slices and duck hooks.

Back To The Wall To fix this problem, try what I’m doing here. Situate yourself with a wall behind you and take your address position with your backside barely touching the wall. Now, in slow motion, simulate your backswing until your arms reach waist high. (If you think you might hit the wall with your club, try this exercise with the headcover on so you don’t damage your club.) If you find your clubhead touching the wall, you’re moving too far to the inside!

Back To The Wall With a correct backswing path, eventually you’ll hit the wall with your clubhead, but in this first part of your backswing, the club should run along the target line for as long as possible. Practicing with a wall behind you will help you do just that. This exercise is also helpful for players who struggle with what’s called “laying off”—aka, dropping the clubhead behind the body during the backswing because of a weak pair of wrists. Once the hands reach waist high, the toe of the clubhead should point straight up and be away from the wall (like I’m doing in the above photo and not like I'm doing here). If the clubhead touches the wall, then you know you need to practice your takeaway by first leading the backswing with the upper body along the target line. Once the upper body can’t turn comfortably anymore, the lower body then kicks in to round out a complete backswing.

Barry Goldstein is a professional golf teacher at Inverrary CC in Fort Lauderdale, Fla.

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Fake vs. Real Backswings

Fake vs. Real

How to spot a good backswing from a bad one

Golf instruction usually is loaded with tips on what you need to do to optimize your downswing and impact position. And while that’s obviously important, I believe it’s just as important to know how to make a proper backswing. After all, the backswing is where you build speed and width—two essential ingredients to a strong, consistent golf swing.

Check out these two photos. The left one is the bad backswing, the other is the good backswing. Looking at the bad one, you can see that my wrists aren’t hinged fully and my left arm is bent. This creates a narrow swing arc with a lack of power and control. Second, my left shoulder and head aren’t behind the golf ball, so I’m poised to make a steep, over-the-top swing with a reverse-pivot. This combination of swing flaws leads to high, weak slices and off-center hits.

Look at the good backswing, starting with the hands. A lot of my students think that a good backswing means the hands and club are high above the body at the top. That’s a myth. A good position for the hands is one with the arms extended, the wrists fully hinged and the clubface parallel to the left forearm. This will create a lot of width and leverage. Second, the body must rotate instead of lifting up and down. The proper rotation of the shoulders puts the left shoulder and head behind the ball and increases the weight distribution on my right side. I have a lot more torque in this position than I do in the faulty backswing, where I’ve done no more than lift my arms and “fake” a strong backswing.

So check your swing position at the top and see if you’re “faking it.” If so, concentrate more on hinging the wrists and rotating the body. If you do, your weight will shift automatically and you’ll be poised at the top of your swing to make a strong downswing into the golf ball.

Karen Nannen, PGA, is the director of instruction at Desert Highlands Golf Club in Scottsdale, Arizona.

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Going Low

Going Low

Jam Your Back Foot

In the last issue of Golf Tips, I showed you how to use the edge of a wall to help improve your chipping. This month, I’m going to show you how a simple household item, such as a doorjamb, can help you hit the ball farther.

It’s not uncommon for me to see students who have too much lateral motion on the backswing causing them to sway and loose stability. When this happens, the golf swing also loses power and consistency—two things every golfer strives to have in his or her swing. To avoid a “power leak,” a doorjamb, otherwise used to hold a door open, can serve as a useful tool to help prevent the body from sliding and swaying on the backswing. (Now, some have advocated using a golf ball under the foot, but that’s both uncomfortable and unstable. A doorjamb like this one is more effective.) The good thing about this drill is you can do it anywhere, whether it be at home or on the practice range. To utilize this device, place the doorjamb underneath the heel of your back foot (my right foot), with the thick end of the doorjamb underneath the outside of your foot. Initially, the doorjamb will do two things: It will first help you retain some flex in your back leg on the backswing to prevent swaying, and two, it will help you better push off the inside of your back foot on the downswing.

Better players know that shifting weight means shifting as it relates to turning on the backswing; hence, it’s not a lateral slide or a forced move from side to side. Instead, as you make the backswing, the weight should shift as a result of coiling your upper and lower body above your right side. The doorjamb in this case will help you keep that weight centered over the inside of your foot, as opposed to over the outer side of your foot when you sway. This is critical, since like a track runner pushing off the runner’s block, the golf swing requires the back foot to be positioned securely so the golfer can push off the inside of the back foot as the clubface passes through the impact area on the downswing. The doorjamb will help you do just that!

After a few swings with the doorjamb, remove it and feel the difference. You should immediately feel a greater source of power as you coil your backswing and on the downswing as you leverage your back foot against the ground.

A 15-year veteran of the LPGA Tour, Pam Wright teaches at We-Ko-Pa Golf Club in Arizona. To learn more about Pam, visit our newly redesigned Website: www.golftipsmag.com/instructors.

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