Golf Lessons: Alignment Washington DC

Open shoulders at address force the clubhead to come from outside the target line. This path, combined with a face that’s square to the target, imparts the dreaded left-to-right sidespin.

University of Maryland Junior Golf Camp
(301) 403-4181
University of Maryland Golf Course
College Park, MD
 
4 Star Summer Camps at the University of Virginia
(800) 334-7827
PO Box 3387
Falls Church, VA
 
Turfgrass Trends
1775 T Street NW
Washington, DC
 
East Potomac Public Golf Course -Red
202/554-7660
970 Ohio Dr Sw
Washington , DC
Type
Public
# of Holes
9

Data Provided by:
East Potomac Public Golf Course -White
202/554-7660
970 Ohio Dr Sw
Washington , DC
Type
Public
# of Holes
9

Data Provided by:
University of Maryland Junior Golf Camp
(301) 403-4181
University of Maryland Golf Course
College Park, MD
 
4 Star Summer Camps at the University of Virginia
(800) 334-7827
PO Box 3387
Falls Church, VA
 
Langston Course & D.R.
(202) 397-8638
2600 Benning Rd NE
Washington, DC
 
Landscape Architecture Magazine 
(202) 686-2752
4401 Connecticut Avenue
NW Washington, DC
 
East Potomac Public Golf Course -Blue
202/554-7660
970 Ohio Dr Sw
Washington , DC
Type
Public
# of Holes
18

Data Provided by:
Data Provided by:

Align the Easy Way

Align The Easy Way


Align The Easy Way Most of my students struggle with the slice. Many of these golfers have serious swing issues, but the majority certainly possess enough talent and an understanding of the golf swing to keep slices at bay. The problem is they’re trapped into hitting slices because their setup facilitates swinging on the out-in path to which all slices owe their existence.

If you’re prone to slicing, I’ll bet that you set up to the ball with your shoulders aligned too far to the left. It’s a common malady that’s difficult to self-diagnose. Open shoulders at address force the clubhead to come from outside the target line. This path, combined with a face that’s square to the target, imparts the dreaded left-to-right sidespin.

To help my students better align themselves at address, I have them focus on their shirt buttons. The buttons on your shirt can help line up your shoulders correctly and guard against creating an out-in path. In fact, they’re useful for setting up any type of shot shape.

When you want to hit the ball straight, make certain that the buttons on your shirt are square to the ball at setup, and again at and through impact. This will help you hit the ball straight down the target line. When attempting to purposely fade the ball, make certain that the buttons are a little open, or aimed left of the golf ball at address (see illustration), and again at and through impact. This will start the ball slightly left of your target line. Finally, when you need to draw the ball, make certain the buttons are aimed slightly right of the golf ball, and again at and through impact. These simple, visual images work and can greatly assist you in shaping shots out on the golf course.

It’s crucial to be able to turn the ball in different directions. Use your buttons and shorten up those doglegs and create better scoring opportunities wherever you play.

Instruction Editor and PGA teaching professional Barry Goldstein instructs at Polar Shot Golf Center in Johnson City, N.Y., and Inverrary Golf Club in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. He is a regular guest on The Golf Channel’s “Academy Live.”

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Alignment Beats the Slice

Alignment Beats The Slice

Alignment Beats The SliceBody alignment is one of two key setup elements most frequently changed by amateur golfers (the other is ball position). Because players often associate the alignment of their upper body with the starting direction of the ball off the clubface, they tend to incorrectly alter their alignment for a variety of reasons, the most common of which is to compensate for a chronic pull slice. While the logic of aiming the torso further left to prevent hitting the ball to the right may appear sound at first, this faulty compensation actually causes more harm than good in the long term.

Another common alignment change players make when fighting a pull slice is aiming their feet to the right of the target, creating a body position that features a closed lower body stance and open shoulders. So instead of aligning the shoulders and feet square to each other, as they should be, the player has assumed a classic pull-slice setup position without even knowing it. In effect, they’ve fueled the fire that they’re trying to fight.

The important thing to understand regarding a pull-slice stance is that it starts a chain of events that’s almost impossible to stop or save in the downswing. When the feet are aligned farther right of the target than the shoulders, it almost always results in a takeaway that goes too far to the inside along the toe line and then back out over to the shoulder line on the way down. This inside takeaway and over-the-top transition results in a club that strikes the outside of the ball, starting it left with a high degree of left-to-right spin. Remember, you always want to give yourself a chance to hit the inside of the ball if you want to make consistently solid contact.

The Fix: Put a shaft down on the ground and point it slightly left of the target. Assume your setup position and point your shoulders slightly right of the target. Make sure your left foot is farther from the ball than your right foot and your left shoulder is closer to the ball than your right (feet slightly open, shoulders slightly closed). This position will allow you to deliver the club from the inside rather than over-the-top, across your body, and you should immediately feel freer and more powerful.

Kevin Scheller’s students include professional golfers, nationally ranked juniors and Division I collegiate players.

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