Golf Lesson Washington DC

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University of Maryland Junior Golf Camp
(301) 403-4181
University of Maryland Golf Course
College Park, MD
 
4 Star Summer Camps at the University of Virginia
(800) 334-7827
PO Box 3387
Falls Church, VA
 
University of Maryland Junior Golf Camp
(301) 403-4181
University of Maryland Golf Course
College Park, MD
 
4 Star Summer Camps at the University of Virginia
(800) 334-7827
PO Box 3387
Falls Church, VA
 

Give Your Swing A Tune Up



It's already the middle of the golf season, and I'm sure some of you are finding yourselves stuck in a rut. Don't worry, it happens. Golf is a fickle game. One day you have it; the next day you don't.

Knowing that every golfer—even Tour pros—suffer from common faults, I've come up with 10 common ones, and the fixes that will best address them.

I've structured this article so that it moves fluidly from tee to green, from fundamentals to feel. If you want to completely overhaul your game, try each tip in the order I've written them. If you find one tip that speaks directly to your current needs, then practice that one. Everything here was meant to address common faults, and hopefully after reading it, you'll be able to fix whatever ails you.


SETUP

IMPACT
1. START FROM IMPACT!
I always tell my students to play with "educated hands." And by "educated hands," I mean hands that hold the club properly so they can optimize how the clubface makes contact with the ball.

So how do you do that? It's simple: Go to a correct impact position and then grip the club in a way that it squares up the clubface. Consider what the clubshaft looks like at impact. The golf shaft has a forward lean and is in line with your lead arm. While that's happening, the clubface is aimed at your target and delofted. At that moment, your hips have rotated and your weight favors the forward foot, all while your hands are in the best position to make solid contact. Educate your hands so that your grip promotes a forward wrist that's flat/unhinged, and your rear wrist is bent.

My rear wrist is bent, and my forward wrist is flat.
In the photos at left and above right, notice that I've secured door hinges to my wrists to help illustrate this point. When you grip your club at the impact position, it allows your hands to lead and control the swing so you return the club to impact and "smash" it into the back of the ball.

To begin ingraining the feeling of a proper hand position, hit some short chip shots so your forward hand controls your shot's direction, and the rear hand controls the club's loft. Once you've successfully hit a number of shots in a row, increase the size and speed of your swing until you're making full swings and producing noticeable ballflight control. Educated hands are critical to playing great golf!

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Steve Marino



Looking at this beautiful impact position of Steve Marino, you'd think he possessed a classic swing. Anyone who has seen Marino lashing about the fairways, however, knows that his technique might be a little closer to Bubba Watson or Jim Furyk than Ernie Els!

I'll point out all of the great things Marino is doing here, but if you're a swing junky like me, I encourage you to hop online and do a YouTube search to see him in motion. I've found quite a few great examples, and if you look at the "down-the-line" angles, you'll fully appreciate just how much athleticism Marino exhibits to find this classic look at the bottom.

1) BEHIND THE ACTION
Here Marino's head position is in perfect form to hit it a ton. Just like a home-run hitter needs to be "behind the ball" for optimal swat, here he's dead-solid perfect! Whether you prefer to play with a steady head or move off the ball a bit, make sure that, into the strike, the left side of your face stays behind the ball.

2) OPEN FOR BUSINESS
One common thing I see every day on the lesson tee is a player who returns to impact with very much the same body alignments he or she held at address. Here you can see the contrast in that attitude, as Marino's hips and shoulders are rotated well to the left at contact. This is the common alignment you'll see in all ball-and-stick sports, such as baseball, tennis and hockey. Think of the similarities in sports you may already excel at and notice how easily they apply to the game of golf.

3) SAFE LANDING
One characteristic of great drivers is a sweeping, level angle of attack that leaves the tee standing tall. Most poor drivers attack with too much of a downward strike, snapping their tee as it's pushed into the turf. To feel more sweep, make your practice swings just above ball height, creating a level swish into the finish. After a few successful misses, bend over a touch farther and swing away. Look for that tee to remain safe and sound and you'll be on your way to better tee shots!
WHAT'S IN STEVE'S BAG
• Driver: Cleveland HiBORE XLS Tour 9.5°
• 3-Wood: HiBORE XLS 15°
• 5-Wood: Launcher Comp 19°
• Hybrid: Adams Idea Pro 20°
• Irons: 4-9 CG Tour
• PW, SW, LW: CG14
• Putter: Never Compromise Gambler
• Ball: Titleist Pro V1x

4) GROUND ATTACK
If you know anything about Steve's swing, you're aware that his backswing is incredibly...

Click here to read the rest of this article from Golf Tips Magazine